Jeremy (butterwelles) wrote,
Jeremy
butterwelles

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Digression

Trying to report on my Florida vacation I've been staring at a blank screen for days.  Whenever inspired to write, I'm away; whenever here, in front of a computer with time, I'm drab.

There have been recent, faith-restoring days of teacher aiding.  Last Tuesday it was a fourth-grade class.  The kids so cute, inquisitive, and strict about class-routine.  Ten-year olds are masters of protocol.  The teacher was also a substitute; female, class of '98, no less; and she did us proud with her attentive, assured, and fair manner.  As for the kids and me, They were first impressed by my height, then athletic movements.  By their frequent requests for my help, I imagine they appreciated, or at least were amused by, my elaborations.  One particularly beaming, bean-poll Asian boy said that I looked like a scientist, for which I duly thanked him.

Then today it was at the high school, a mentally-handicapped class, but not of the more severe cases.  It was interesting to note the differences in areas of deficiency.  Take for instance, the two girls with whom I worked closely on an assignment where they had to answer questions about the directions of a board game.  One of them read outloud with all the pauses and muff-throughs of a first-grader, and had scrawling hand-writing of the same quality.  She also spoke with spurts in a gutteral strain.  Whereas the other spoke with calm fluency, two languages no less (English and Spanish); and read with ease and had neat, almost pretty handwriting.  Yet when it came to answering the questions, it was the nearly illiterate one who did the answering with ease, while the "normal" one struggled and often seemed a little bewildered.  I suppose one had a motor-skill deficiency and the other a concentration one.

Another girl, with a protruding forhead, had a long discussion with invisible people, or animals, during lunchtime.

Our teacher was a trim, 60ish New York woman who liked wearing a wind-breaker and ballcap.  Of course the class was inline.

But it wasn't through sardonic sarcasm ala NYPD Blue, or Law & Order, or any of your hundreds of run-of-the-mill moving pictures set in cardboard etc. etc.  It was through a bald concentration on manners and integrity.  "Old-fashioned", she deemed it.  And she used the word "cue" for "call on" or "alert".  I like her.
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